Why Trump’s rise doesn’t terrify me

Donald Trump’s political rise in the Republican presidential race is alarming many people in this country. Some view his political rise as a testament that (white) Americans are angry against globalization/trade and fear America turning more hispanic. Others, like myself, view Trump’s ascendency as a fad that does not truly represent American stance on several important issues.… More Why Trump’s rise doesn’t terrify me

To Millennials’ Supporters of Bernie Sanders: Curb your enthusiasm

The Washington Post has a piece about millennials fondness for Bernie Sanders‘s 2016 presidential campaign. The Post writes, They are the country’s gloom-and-doom generation of millennials — and they have found a gloom-and-doom candidate to love in the 2016 presidential election: Sen. Bernie Sanders, the democratic socialist from Vermont who has attracted a stream of young people… More To Millennials’ Supporters of Bernie Sanders: Curb your enthusiasm

Why outsourcing jobs to China has helped the world’s poor

Promoting his newly released book Deep South: Four Seasons on Back Roads, Paul Theroux has an op-ed in the New York Times, where he lambasts American CEOs for their “hypocrisy”. He states, EVERY so often, you hear grotesquely wealthy American chief executives announce in sanctimonious tones the intention to use their accumulated hundreds of millions, or… More Why outsourcing jobs to China has helped the world’s poor

Why Joseph Kabila Will Cling on to Power

As we slowly approach November 2016, it is becoming increasingly clear that Joseph Kabila will extend his stay in power. Despite the Congolese president remaining mum on the subject, his supporters tried (unsuccessfully) to extend his stay by mandating a census before the 2016 general elections, but that option was killed off after mass protests nationwide.… More Why Joseph Kabila Will Cling on to Power

Why Industrial Policy is not a solution for Africa’s problem

Since the early 2000s, sub-saharan African countries have experienced modest economic growth thanks to China’s growing appetite for commodities, macroeconomic stability, and strengthening political institutions. This growth has led many Western media outlets such as the Economist to get cheery about the continent’s economic prospects. In his recent post for the blog africascountry, Zambian PhD candidate in economics, Grieve Chelwa,… More Why Industrial Policy is not a solution for Africa’s problem

Don’t Blame South African Xenophobia on Apartheid

Much ink has been spilled to figure out the root causes of recent xenophobic attacks in South Africa. Some have blamed it on the ruling African National Congress (ANC)’s government inability to deal with high crime, poverty, and unemployment rates, while others, including Garikai Chengu are pointing the finger at Apartheid legacy. In his recent article, titled “Xenophobia… More Don’t Blame South African Xenophobia on Apartheid

Why including a chapter on currency manipulation in TPP is a bad idea

Although China hasn’t (yet) joined the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade deal between the U.S. and 11 pacific rim nations, she is already impacting current trade discussions in Washington, DC. Proponents on this side of the pacific are demanding the Obama administration to include a currency manipulation chapter in TPP to prevent countries (read: China) from manipulating exchange-rates to make… More Why including a chapter on currency manipulation in TPP is a bad idea

After Australia, South Africa should also sign a FTA with China

After ten years of intense negotiations, China and Australia finally signed a free-trade agreement (FTA) that will strengthen economic ties between the two pacific nations. This FTA is mutually beneficial given both countries’ complementarity. Canberra’s primary sector will continue to woo investors eager to satisfy China’s appetite for commodity and agricultural products. While the threshold on Chinese… More After Australia, South Africa should also sign a FTA with China

Kabila’s Waiting Game is Costly to D.R. Congo

Less than two years before the 2016 general elections, Congolese still do not know whether or not Joseph Kabila, the incumbent President in power since 2001 after his father, Laurent Desire Kabila, was assassinated, will peacefully leave power. After winning the first free and fair multiparty elections in 2006, he narrowly won the 2011 elections,… More Kabila’s Waiting Game is Costly to D.R. Congo